Website Honoring Those Dead from Health Insurance Denials Met with Criticism

In an effort to shed some light on the number of people who fall victim to the health care system each year, a new website has been launched to honor those who have died as a result of health insurance denials. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) started the site, which was launched in October 2009, to show just how many people suffer from the lack of adequate health insurance.

Names of the Dead

According to the site, NamesoftheDead.com, each year there are “more than 44,000 Americans who die simply because they have no health insurance.” Grayson’s statistics come from a recent Harvard study that showed that as many as 45,000 deaths annually can be tied to a lack of health insurance. His idea was to create a project that honors their memory and also help to shed light on the need for adequate health insurance for all Americans.

Criticism of the Site’s Purpose

While Grayson seems to have developed the site with good intentions, his site has received its share of criticism. Some Republicans in particular have noted that he’s exploiting the dead for political gain. Grayson has undoubtedly made his rounds in the public arena to discuss his beliefs, even referring to the GOP plan as “Don’t get sick, and if you do get sick, die quickly.”

The Site Gets “Punked”

No, Ashton Kutcher didn’t create an identical website then show it to Grayson as it dissolved under a virus attack. However, some pranksters did add names such as Wile E. Coyote and Norma Jeane Mortenson (Marilyn Monroe’s real name) to the site, supposedly as those dead from health care denial. The lack of proper security/screening was to blame for these mistakes, and it appears the site has made changes to account for these errors since.

In the meantime, Senators push to overhaul the health care system so that most all Americans are included. President Obama hopes to have completed legislation on his desk by year-end.

Do you think a website to honor those dead from health care denials is appropriate?